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Persnickity Persimmon

This entry was posted on February 11, 2013 by McEvoy Ranch.

I love persimmons in both of their forms. I enjoy crispy fuyus with almond butter in the morning, sliced thinly in cornmeal galletes, and roasted alongside chicken or pork. And Hachiyas, the variety that is eaten when it is absolute mush, are ooey and gooey in just the right way. This Jersey girl has a hard time with that sit cross-leged type of meditation, but I do think that waiting for a hardened, temptingly rich orange persimmon to ripen qualifies as a test of non-attachment. I'd like to say I've mastered this act of zen, but every year I slip at least once and get a big tanic, moisture sucking mouthful. I love persimmons in their raw state so much that I've shied away from trying to preserve them. If something is so perfect, why make it into something else? Well, because one persimmon tree yields a whole lot of persimmons and even I couldn't eat them all in time. Plus, their unique season coincides with our downtime at the ranch. And what is downtime for if not for filling with activities that then make it a busy time? So on the list of persimmon experiments are persimmon paste(think membrillo), persimmon pesto, persimmon preserves, and persimmon curd. Do I like the idea of curd more or less because it doesn't contain illiteration...not sure yet. As a jam maker it seems like I shouldn't admit that I have favorite fruits, as a parent isn't supposed to admit that clever Katie with her perfect ponytail and sweet laugh touches their heart a bit more than their other children. But the truth is, I do. And its time to delve into the preserving possibilities of persimmons. My goal is to next year make a small batch creation from my favorite fruit to stand alongside things like Tomato Rosemary Preserves and Crabapple Meyer Lemon Marmalade in our ferry building shop. Searching the web I found a persimmon jam made by female farmers in Japan and a persimmon paste fashioned into the shape of a delicate flower. So I have hope for this endeavor. I'll let you know how it goes. But, first, do you preserve persimmons? Any suggestions?

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